Right Stuff

What reggae music really needed in 1982 was more vocoder. So thought the members of Black Uhuru, and it turned out they were right. Black Uhuru really took roots reggae into the 80’s and kept it relevant and stayed abreast of new technology, pretty much singlehandedly. They dabbled with synthesizers and electronic effects and studio trickery, vocoders included – just enough to sound timely, but not so much as to lose their sense of rootedness. It sounds like island music, and it recognizably like 80’s music. That’s a tough balance to strike, but Black Uhuru had an amazing run of classic albums throughout the decade and all the way into the 90’s.

Moya (Queen of I Jungle)

Nothing better in the world than some good reggae. Of course, reggae is a great groove to relax and feel good; therein its worldwide popularity. But the best reggae is also thought provoking. Black Uhuru has always been one of the best reggae bands, both musically and lyrically. Their classic 1982 album Chill Out is a great place to start, for anyone whose reggae experience begins and ends with Legend. Seriously, though, if your working knowledge of reggae music begins and ends with Bob Marley’s Legend, I feel sorry for you and hope you can remedy yourself as soon as possible.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yL8rtqVU3U%5B/embed ]